Earth

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Earth from Old English: Eorðe; Greek: Γαῖα Gaia; Latin: Terra, otherwise known as the World or the Globe, is the third planet from the Sun and the only object in the Universe known to harbor life. It is the densest planet in the Solar System and the largest of the four terrestrial planets.
According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth formed about 4.54 billion years ago. Earth’s gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun and the Moon, Earth’s only natural satellite. During one orbit around the Sun, Earth rotates about its axis about 365.26 times; thus, an Earth year is about 365.26 days long. Earth’s axis of rotation is tilted, producing seasonal variations on the planet’s surface. The gravitational interaction between the Earth and Moon causes ocean tides, stabilizes the Earth’s orientation on its axis, and gradually slows its rotation.
Earth’s lithosphere is divided into several rigid tectonic plates that migrate across the surface over periods of many millions of years. Earth’s interior remains active with a solid iron inner core, a liquid outer core that generates the Earth’s magnetic field, and a convecting mantle that drives plate tectonics.

After the Colony War no oceans are left on earth. The above picture is an artist’s depiction of what Earth most likely looks like from space.

Earth

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